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Our cat helped build a sw...
Forum: Attracting wildlife
Last Post: nehasharma
02-07-2022, 08:04 AM
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Where are all the butterf...
Forum: Attracting wildlife
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"green" landscape design
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  Butterfly "puddles"
Posted by: jcline - 10-18-2011, 11:32 AM - Forum: Attracting wildlife - Replies (4)

Mud... If it has the correct minerals and always stays moist, you have created a butterfly buffet. I am not sure what minerals attract butterflies.

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  Cape Fuschia's
Posted by: jcline - 10-10-2011, 06:13 PM - Forum: Plants - Replies (2)

Cape Fuschias are natives of South Africa and are reliably hardy only in USDA Plant Hardiness Zones 8 and 9. (Here's a link to the USDA zone map for the Pacific Northwest: http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/hzm-nw1.html) It looks like, depending on exactly where in the Pacific Northwest you live, the plants should be able to overwinter successfully outdoors. Mulching over the winter isn't a bad idea, and then you can cut it back almost to the ground in the spring. It looks like a nice plant!

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  hydrangea
Posted by: dilley - 08-15-2011, 09:40 PM - Forum: Plants - Replies (1)

It might be lacking nutrients such as potassium...

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  Landscaping front of Ranch home
Posted by: busgirl - 08-11-2011, 05:29 PM - Forum: Design - Replies (3)

Help - in 2 weeks we will have to dig up the front of my father-in-laws home to repair basement walls. We are trying to settle his estate and the house is for sale. I'm hoping that I might save two or three of his lovely rose bushes (bad time of year to do this to them though), but am happy to lose the big evergreen/yew thing and the brick planter. I think the planter makes the house seem shorter and it's absence will open things up. But . . . what to do to nicely define the entryway? Your suggestions would be SO appreciated!!!

[image]http://www.flickr.com/photos/65983835@N07/6033017211/in/photostream[/image]

NO idea if this picture will appear (first timer), but the link to it is:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/65983835@N0...hotostream

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  pests
Posted by: judy7827 - 07-29-2011, 01:48 PM - Forum: Pests - Replies (2)

i have a bug on my tall phlox and have had for years. the bug is orange with a black strip down the middle. he/she does not live in the dirt and he/she does not fly, that i've seen. he/she seems to suck the green out of the leaves because they become mottled and disfigured. this bug does not kill the plant. it must lay eggs repeatedly in the flower buds. i have tried a granular insecticide, sevin dust and eight with no lasting luck. there are other perennials in the same bed but they are unaffected. i have tall phlox in other parts of my yard with no bugs. hot weather like we are having now or cooler weather doesn't seem to make a difference. these bugs come back every year. help.

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  Where are all the butterflies?
Posted by: Rita_Mae - 07-15-2011, 08:18 PM - Forum: Attracting wildlife - Replies (4)

A smorgasbord awaits them as well as a nursery for the Monarchs (swamp milkweed and butterfly weed). Alas! No customers except one small white guy.
Any ideas? Any encouragement?
Thank you,
... rita b
Garden Addict and Sometime Librarian

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  Our cat helped build a swallow's nest!
Posted by: jcline - 05-20-2011, 12:20 PM - Forum: Attracting wildlife - Replies (2)

Our dear, sweet cat gave up some of her abundance of hair she sheds 24/7...to the Violet Green Swallow's for nest building materials this year. Since birds have no sense of smell...I thought it was appropriate that cats get a good name for "something". Our cat never goes outside...but she loves watching the birds from a sunny windowsill. She has to earn her keep somehow! [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

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  Tomato Varieties
Posted by: MarcyinMN - 05-20-2011, 10:04 AM - Forum: Edibles - Replies (4)

I am looking for tasty, but disease resistant, tomato varieties. I like Brandywine, but have had trouble with fungal diseases which occur even when I rotate my tomato plant location. Other varieties I have tried do not have the flavor I remember from childhood. Any recommendations on good varieties? Tips on controlling the fungus?

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  Planting around tree roots
Posted by: MarcyinMN - 05-17-2011, 10:46 AM - Forum: Gardening - Replies (3)

I would like to plant perennial flowers where there are tree and shrub roots. Do I need to be concerned about hurting the existing trees and shrubs if I cut through their roots in order to dig holes for the flowers?

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  Clay Pot Project
Posted by: Kathleen_A - 05-13-2011, 10:04 AM - Forum: Design - Replies (2)

About two weeks ago I was browsing through my Garden Gate magazines and I saw a project for clay pots. You were to build a base (out of wood?), secure a dowel (?) in the center, and stack clay pots to the top of the dowel. You could then put a plant in each pot for a beautiful raised display.

I have spent the last two days searching for this article to no avail. I have used the online index, I have looked at numerous magazines going back to the articles I had been researching two weeks ago and I just cannot find it!

I have been a subscriber to Garden Gate since the first issue, so I have a lot of magazines to look through! Does anyone remember this project? If so, please let me know!

Thank you! Thank you!

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